Sunday, August 27, 2017

Himalayan Salt Stone Massage and the Benefits


Himalayan salt stones are warmed and massaged over the body to ground and balance the body’s electromagnetic field, central nervous system and meridians. From the ancient primal sea beneath the Himalayan Mountains, these hand-carved salt stones harmonize and revitalize to gently soothe away an accumulation of stress and tension to bring the mind, body and spirit into balance.

What is it like to get a Himalayan Salt Stone Massage

If you ever treated yourself to a hot stone massage you'll find that a Himalayan Stone Massage is similar. However, clients report that they can feel the minerals of Himalayan salt being absorbed into their bodies in addition to the soothing glide of the stone.
Incorporating warm Himalayan salt stone into trigger point massage can provide substantial pain relief as well as mineral benefits.

Softer Moisturized Skin

With over 84 naturally occurring minerals and salts that replenish the body’s largest organ, the skin, you’ll feel your skin radiating during a Himalayan salt stone massage. These salts and minerals are naturally antimicrobial and antibacterial, which helps to eliminate harmful toxins that build up in your body.
As your massage progresses, your skin will become tangibly softer and more moisturized.
During the course of a massage with warm Himalayan salt stones, the minerals are absorbed through the skin. The total effect is a profound sense of well-being.

Post Massage Benefits

After your Himalayan salt stone massage, you'll likely notice the following:
  • Improved sleep
  • Deep sense of relaxation
  • Easier breathing
  • Increased blood circulation
  • Reduced signs of aging
  • Glowing, healthy skin
  • Increased sense of well-being
  • Sore muscles have been soothed
  • A calming of the nervous system
  • Light skin exfoliation
  • Heated Himalayan salt stones emit negative ions thereby delivering a myriad of health benefits--from higher mental alertness to protection against germs in the air


TIPS:
For a professional massage, seek a licensed massage therapist. The American Massage Therapy Association recommends you ask your massage therapist about their credentials to practice massage therapy. Talk to your massage therapist about why you are seeking massage therapy -- this will help your therapist choose the best style and approach to your massage.

Roy is a New York State Licensed Massage Therapist and has worked in high end spa’s as well as rehabilitation centers. He is well known for his Relaxing Massage as well as his skill in Medical Massage and Sports Massage. Contact Roy at 631-375-0962 or email at info@wavecrestmassage.com to schedule your next appointment










Saturday, August 19, 2017

Lymphatic Drainage



Two lymphatic disorders that massage therapy—more specifically manual lymphatic drainage (MLD)—has shown some promise in helping are edema and lymphedema.

These conditions can occur for many reasons, including post-operatively (especially for cancer treatments that require lymph node removal), acute injury, orthopedic trauma and some autoimmune conditions, to name a few.

Lymphatic System Basics 

In simplest terms, the lymphatic system is a network of vessels, nodes and organs that work as part of the immune system to carry lymph fluid that is rich in infection-fighting white blood cells throughout the body, while also helping rid the body of waste and excess fluid. In addition to the nodes and vessels, the tonsils, thymus and spleen are all part of the lymphatic system.
Via the circulatory system, blood delivers oxygen, nutrients and hormones to cells and also collects waste. This exchange takes place in the interstitial fluid surrounding the cells. About 90 percent of this interstitial fluid returns to the circulatory system as venous blood. That last 10 percent is lymph fluid, which travels through the body via lymph vessels, passing through lymph nodes, where excess fluid and waste products are filtered out. Here, too, lymphocytes (specialized white blood cells) kill pathogens that might be present.
Lymph can only move in one direction—upward, toward the neck, where it reenters the circulatory system via the subclavian veins. And unlike blood in the circulatory system, which relies on the heart pumping, lymph fluid depends on muscle contractions in the surrounding skeletal muscles to move through the lymphatic vessels.
The average person has approximately 600 to 700 lymph nodes.

Benefits of Manual Lymphatic Drainage (MLD)
MLD is generally discussed as a massage technique that works to encourage the natural movement of lymph fluid. “It is a systemic, rhythmic method of purposefully stretching the skin to produce an increase in the volume of flow of the lymph fluid through the filtering system of the body.
For many, the main benefits of MLD are going to be helping reduce edemas and inflammation and prevent lymphedema—the latter being of particular importance as there currently is no cure for lymphedema.

Reduce Edema and Inflammation
One of the biggest benefits of MLD is the quick reduction of edemas that occur, in part, because MLD—unlike some conventional treatments like medication, edema pumps or pulling the fluid out with a syringe—helps move the protein, not just the water. Because of the physiology of the edema, treatments that focus on moving the water component but not the protein molecule can create a cycle of dependency. So people begin to rely on the medication or pump, for example, to move the fluid.
MLD may help the lymph do its job better. By understanding the anatomy and function of this delicate system, your massage therapist can assist your body in clearing sluggish tissues of waste and swelling.


TIPS:
For a professional massage, seek a licensed massage therapist. The American Massage Therapy Association recommends you ask your massage therapist about their credentials to practice massage therapy. Talk to your massage therapist about why you are seeking massage therapy -- this will help your therapist choose the best style and approach to your massage.

Roy is a New York State Licensed Massage Therapist and has worked in high end spa’s as well as rehabilitation centers. He is well known for his Relaxing Massage as well as his skill in Medical Massage and Sports Massage. Contact Roy at 631-375-0962 or email: info@wavecrestmassage.com to schedule your next appointment